Christian fiction author Allison K. Garcia returns to Potstirrer Podcast to share with us about her upcoming novel, Finding Seguridad, the second in the Buscando Home series. The conversation includes discussion of themes in the book, as well as a range of topics, including the experiences of Latino immigrants and other marginalized groups in the current political and social environment, domestic violence, deconstruction and reconstruction of Christian faith, coming out as LGBTQ+ as a Christian, Black Lives Matter, and more.

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This Patreon bonus episode, originally released March 2019, is being released free this month as part of Flying Machine’s Flyer Drive! To learn more and become a Patron, go to http://flyingmachine.network/support. Enjoy this episode!

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” is famous for several iconic statements, including the admonishment of “white moderates.” But did you know that the “white moderates” Dr. King was referring to were specific local clergymen in Birmingham who had written an open letter opposing the protests he helped to organize? These clergy are dubbed “The Birmingham Eight.” Who were these men? What did it mean for them to be “moderate,” and how did they respond to Dr. King’s letter? And what can this incident in American history teach us about allyship?

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Highly-rated Latino Christian fiction author Allison K. Garcia is back on Potstirrer Podcast to share with listeners information about her upcoming novel, Finding Amor. Allison chats with Jaye about the inspiration for the new book, writing about characters in a different culture than her own, the family separation crisis on the US/Mexico border, and more! Allison even gives us a sneak peek of what we can expect from Finding Amor!

*Note: Please excuse the sound quality of the episode, as I am testing out new ways of recording interview episodes. – Jaye

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When I taught political science courses, one of my favorite lessons would be on Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. That would usually come up in the civil rights chapter of the American government intro courses, or I would include it in my courses on race, gender and politics. The reason why it was my favorite was because it gave me an opportunity to share with my students the real Dr. King, and see them wrestle with it.

Each year in the United States, we take a day in January to observe Dr. King’s birthday. He is lauded as a great, non-violent civil rights leader who gave the “I Have a Dream” speech.

And he was. But understanding Dr. King, and why his message was so controversial and challenging to white America despite his philosophy of non-violence, we have to go beyond the Dream.

Much of what Dr. King said was not only controversial in his time, but also in this time.

The speech I would have my students read was this one. You should read it too.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

In it, Dr. King speaks to issues and solutions that are still difficult for many Americans to process, such as systematic discrimination, white guilt, the responsibility of the white church, affirmative action, and reparations.

For many of us who are only familiar with a sanitized Dr. King, it’s hard to reconcile the Dream with King’s views on these issues. But the history of race and race relations in the United States, like Dr. King’s views on racism and racial progress, are complex. And we should treat these issues with the seriousness and nuance they deserve.

In the age of Trump, Dr. King’s words – all of them – are just as important and timely as ever. Going beyond the Dream and understanding the hard things can help us to grow as a society and nation.