The presidential nomination season is underway, and the Democratic race is heating up. As US Senator Bernie Sanders has received some early momentum, many Democrats, especially moderates, are concerned about Sanders, who is not a Democrat, and his democratic socialist ideology. Should Democrats be worried about the “socialist” label? Also, do Democrats have the right to feel entitled to votes from groups within their base, such as progressives and black Americans?

This is the last podcast episode under the Flying Machine banner, as Flying Machine is shutting down. Potstirrer Podcast will continue unaffiliated.

The experience as part of Flying Machine has been wonderful, and it was an honor to be in community with other amazing content creators. Over time, we became not only fellow creatives, but also friends.

Special thank you to our dear leaders, Malcolm & Justin, for the amazing network and community they built and cultivated, and allowing me to be a part of it. Here’s to new beginnings for all of us who have been part of this adventure. Cheers!

Listen Now!

In the final episode of 2019, Chuckles joins Jaye for a countdown and discussion of the five most downloaded episodes of 2019. They also talk about the 2020 presidential election, including the Trump impeachment, predictions for the Democratic nomination, and if Trump will be re-elected.

Listen Now!

NOTE: Potstirrer Podcast will be on break in the month of January, to prepare for the 2020 election cycle, but will be back in early February!

In the third annual Potstirrer Podcast War on Christmas Special, Jaye discusses the non-Christian origins of several Christmas traditions, including the twelve days of Christmas, Yule logs, Santa Claus and more. How did the Christmas holiday develop over time, and if Christmas isn’t purely “Christian,” what are evangelicals waging the “War on Christmas” truly fighting for?

Listen Now!

In the final installment of America’s Drug War, Jaye discusses recent trends in the American drug landscape, including cannabis decriminalization and legalization in several US states, and the opioid epidemic sweeping suburbs and rural areas. How did the War on Drugs, particularly its focus on the “usual suspects,” lead to the opioid crisis? Will cannabis be legalized on a federal level, and should harder drugs also be legalized?

CONTENT WARNING – This episode includes discussion of mature themes, including illicit drug use, prescription drug abuse, and both legal and illicit drug addiction. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

In the penultimate installment of America’s Drug War, President Ronald Reagan and his successors take the mantle of drug warrior in the 1980s and 1990s. Jaye discusses campaigns and programs designed to reduce drug use in children, such as Just Say No and DARE, as well as the crack epidemic of the 80s, and the shift to punitive measures that the federal government took to win the War on Drugs. Were these efforts successful – and what did “success” truly mean?

CONTENT WARNING – This episode discusses mature themes, including detailed discussion of illicit drug use. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

In the third installment of America’s Drug War, Richard Nixon makes good on his second chance at becoming president of the United States in 1968, instituting his “law and order” policies during his president, chief among them sweeping anti-drug policy. These policies concentrated mostly on cannabis and opiates such as heroin, but also overhauled the way the federal government addressed drugs. Jaye provides context to the America of the 1960s, and discusses Nixon’s War on Drugs as key to his crusade to end the social and political change the 1960s represented.

CONTENT WARNING – This episode discusses mature themes, including illicit drug use and political assassinations. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

We’re taking a short break from the America’s Drug War series to talk urban legends!

In the spirit of the Octobermonth season, Jaye discusses urban legends, particularly three stories voted on by listeners, and provides historical and social context for their spread. What are some common themes in these urban myths? Why do these stories persist, even in the information age? And – are these often frightful tales real? Listen now!

Listen Now!