In the concluding episode of a two-part series, Jaye continues her discussion on the decline of the United States within the framework of her hometown, Detroit, Michigan. She discusses the conditions in Detroit prior to the 1967 Detroit riots that led to the riots and the decline of the city, including workplace discrimination, housing segregation, the destruction of tight-knit black communities by urban renewal, racial strife between white and black Detroiters, and tensions between police and the community. As Detroit is making its comeback, what lessons can Americans learn from Detroit that will help the US survive its “fifth quarter?”

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**WARNING: Mature Subject Matter

Jaye concludes her two-part discussion of the abortion issue in Part II. She discusses the origins of the Religious Right after the Roe v. Wade US Supreme Court decision in 1973, and the role abortion as a political issue played in the formation of the Religious Right. Jaye also reacts to the tendency of the pro-life movement to co-opt equality movements for their own purposes. In addition, alternatives and solutions that would lower abortion rates are presented. Does the pro-life movement truly want to save the lives of the unborn?

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When I taught political science courses, one of my favorite lessons would be on Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. That would usually come up in the civil rights chapter of the American government intro courses, or I would include it in my courses on race, gender and politics. The reason why it was my favorite was because it gave me an opportunity to share with my students the real Dr. King, and see them wrestle with it.

Each year in the United States, we take a day in January to observe Dr. King’s birthday. He is lauded as a great, non-violent civil rights leader who gave the “I Have a Dream” speech.

And he was. But understanding Dr. King, and why his message was so controversial and challenging to white America despite his philosophy of non-violence, we have to go beyond the Dream.

Much of what Dr. King said was not only controversial in his time, but also in this time.

The speech I would have my students read was this one. You should read it too.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

In it, Dr. King speaks to issues and solutions that are still difficult for many Americans to process, such as systematic discrimination, white guilt, the responsibility of the white church, affirmative action, and reparations.

For many of us who are only familiar with a sanitized Dr. King, it’s hard to reconcile the Dream with King’s views on these issues. But the history of race and race relations in the United States, like Dr. King’s views on racism and racial progress, are complex. And we should treat these issues with the seriousness and nuance they deserve.

In the age of Trump, Dr. King’s words – all of them – are just as important and timely as ever. Going beyond the Dream and understanding the hard things can help us to grow as a society and nation.

This special Christmas/New Years episode takes a look at the “War on Christmas” – the belief that societal forces are attempting to attack or downplay the Christmas holiday. The “War on Christmas” tends to be a common idea in conservative Christian circles, and exploited by conservative politicians and media. Is there a “War on Christmas,” and what it the concern about Christmas truly about? Jaye also gives a year in review and gives her predictions regarding what we will see in US national politics in 2018 and beyond. One of these predictions is a bit shocking – don’t miss it!

Admin Note: The next episode of Potstirrer Podcast will be released February 4, 2017. During this break, please be sure to catch up on older episodes, check out the PotstirrerPodcast.com website, and join the conversation on social media. We’re not going anywhere! Thank you for listening.

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Today’s episode continues with the subject matter of alleged sexual misconduct on the part of famous and powerful figures, and how we react to these accounts. This time, Jaye focuses on the case of Roy Moore, the former state court judge running for the US Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions in the state of Alabama. Moore, a controversial politician strongly aligned with the Religious Right, has been accused of making sexual advances towards teenagers, including a 14 year old girl, in the late 1970s. Why are many of us inclined to take the word of the accused if we can relate to them, or if they are powerful figures we like? Is “winning” more important than standing by our word?

CONTENT WARNING: This episode includes discussion of sexual violence. Listener discretion is advised.

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The Washington Post Story

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In today’s episode, host Jaye Pool discusses the importance of truth-telling when working through the divides in American society today. In particular, Jaye focuses on controversies over the the meaning and fate of historical symbols of the Confederacy that came out of the Civil War and Reconstruction, such as Confederate monuments and the Confederate Flag. The Civil War and the mythology that came out of the war’s aftermath can serve as warning against embracing the “alternative facts” of the present day.