In the third installment of America’s Drug War, Richard Nixon makes good on his second chance at becoming president of the United States in 1968, instituting his “law and order” policies during his president, chief among them sweeping anti-drug policy. These policies concentrated mostly on cannabis and opiates such as heroin, but also overhauled the way the federal government addressed drugs. Jaye provides context to the America of the 1960s, and discusses Nixon’s War on Drugs as key to his crusade to end the social and political change the 1960s represented.

CONTENT WARNING – This episode discusses mature themes, including illicit drug use and political assassinations. Listener discretion is advised.

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We’re taking a short break from the America’s Drug War series to talk urban legends!

In the spirit of the Octobermonth season, Jaye discusses urban legends, particularly three stories voted on by listeners, and provides historical and social context for their spread. What are some common themes in these urban myths? Why do these stories persist, even in the information age? And – are these often frightful tales real? Listen now!

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In the second installment of America’s War on Drugs, drug czar Harry Anslinger continues his reign from the 1930s through the early 1960s. During his 32 years as commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, he campaigned against not only about cannabis, but also against narcotics and opiates. Jaye discusses Anslinger’s reach and impact – including on the medical profession and global drug policies, and how he used mainstream society’s fears of racial equality and communism to advance his vision of an anti-drug world.

CONTENT WARNING – The following episode discusses mature themes, including murder, suicide, illicit drug use, child sex abuse and domestic violence. Listener discretion is advised.

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In part one of a two-part series about urban renewal, Jaye delves into the history of America’s urban slums. How did these poor, run-down neighborhoods develop in US cities, and how did these areas become associated with people of color, particularly black Americans?

The history of Cincinnati’s West End is discussed as an illustration of how segregated, impoverished neighborhoods developed over time, and how residents became vulnerable to the negative effects of urban renewal policies.

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This Patreon bonus episode, originally released March 2019, is being released free this month as part of Flying Machine’s Flyer Drive! To learn more and become a Patron, go to http://flyingmachine.network/support. Enjoy this episode!

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” is famous for several iconic statements, including the admonishment of “white moderates.” But did you know that the “white moderates” Dr. King was referring to were specific local clergymen in Birmingham who had written an open letter opposing the protests he helped to organize? These clergy are dubbed “The Birmingham Eight.” Who were these men? What did it mean for them to be “moderate,” and how did they respond to Dr. King’s letter? And what can this incident in American history teach us about allyship?

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When most Americans think of late civil rights icon Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., we often picture a unifying Christian minister who used non-violence to advance his dream of racial equality in the United States. But in death, has Dr. King been whitewashed?

In the final installment of this two-part series, Jaye provides an overview of Dr. King’s transformation – from “outside agitator” to “colorblind civil rights icon.” She examines the making of a hero in the American consciousness, and how willful distortion of Dr. King’s legacy served a political and social purpose. Is our society that different today than the society of the 1960s? And how has the “rehabilitated” King given the United States an easy out from its original sin of racism?

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When most Americans think of late civil rights icon Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., we often picture a unifying Christian minister who used non-violence to advance his dream of racial equality in the United States. King would have been 90 years old this year, had he not been assassinated. We observe his birthday every January, and often hear his name invoked, as well as that of other civil rights leaders, in February during Black History Month.

But in death, has Dr. King been whitewashed?

In the first installment of a two-part series, Jaye discusses some widely-held beliefs regarding Dr. King and the world in which he lived. She provides context for Dr. King’s life, and sets the record straight on a respected, but misunderstood historical figure.

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