In the final installment of America’s Drug War, Jaye discusses recent trends in the American drug landscape, including cannabis decriminalization and legalization in several US states, and the opioid epidemic sweeping suburbs and rural areas. How did the War on Drugs, particularly its focus on the “usual suspects,” lead to the opioid crisis? Will cannabis be legalized on a federal level, and should harder drugs also be legalized?

CONTENT WARNING – This episode includes discussion of mature themes, including illicit drug use, prescription drug abuse, and both legal and illicit drug addiction. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

In the third installment of America’s Drug War, Richard Nixon makes good on his second chance at becoming president of the United States in 1968, instituting his “law and order” policies during his president, chief among them sweeping anti-drug policy. These policies concentrated mostly on cannabis and opiates such as heroin, but also overhauled the way the federal government addressed drugs. Jaye provides context to the America of the 1960s, and discusses Nixon’s War on Drugs as key to his crusade to end the social and political change the 1960s represented.

CONTENT WARNING – This episode discusses mature themes, including illicit drug use and political assassinations. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

With the rash of mass shootings in the United States, including ones such as the El Paso, TX shooting that are linked to domestic terror, what is leading to these mass shooting incidents, and domestic terrorism generally? Jaye discusses a possible culprit, stochastic terrorism. What is stochastic terrorism, and can the violent rhetoric of politicians lead to radicalization and extremist violence? Jaye also examines the demagoguery of Donald Trump, the appeal of white evangelicals to Trump and to gun culture, and how these are connected.

CONTENT WARNING – This episode includes discussion of gun violence. Listener discretion is advised.

Listen Now!

In the final installment of a two-part series about urban renewal, Jaye discusses contemporary urban renewal, particularly the impact of privatization on urban renewal efforts in America’s impoverished inner city neighborhoods. Why have these neighborhoods persisted? Also, what efforts have federal, state and local governments, as well as corporations, made in revitalizing – or gentrifying – these neighborhoods, and have these efforts succeeded? Jaye discusses these approaches, and both the benefits and drawbacks of urban renewal efforts.

Listen Now!

In part one of a two-part series about urban renewal, Jaye delves into the history of America’s urban slums. How did these poor, run-down neighborhoods develop in US cities, and how did these areas become associated with people of color, particularly black Americans?

The history of Cincinnati’s West End is discussed as an illustration of how segregated, impoverished neighborhoods developed over time, and how residents became vulnerable to the negative effects of urban renewal policies.

Listen Now!

This Patreon bonus episode, originally released March 2019, is being released free this month as part of Flying Machine’s Flyer Drive! To learn more and become a Patron, go to http://flyingmachine.network/support. Enjoy this episode!

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” is famous for several iconic statements, including the admonishment of “white moderates.” But did you know that the “white moderates” Dr. King was referring to were specific local clergymen in Birmingham who had written an open letter opposing the protests he helped to organize? These clergy are dubbed “The Birmingham Eight.” Who were these men? What did it mean for them to be “moderate,” and how did they respond to Dr. King’s letter? And what can this incident in American history teach us about allyship?

Listen Now!

Jaye was featured as a guest on the 7/10 episoce of the awesome podcast Stranger Still with hosts Nick Wood and Jon Biegen! Stranger Still is a well-researched and entertaining science and technology podcast on our network Flying Machine.

We discussed code-switching, the practice of using a different language or dialect in addition to American Standard English, alternating depending on the audience. It was a wonderful & insightful conversation. Be sure to check it out!

Listen Now!